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Sent. I fish Maine and they have been trying to outlaw soft baits for years. There are posters up in LL Bean and Maine sport with a trout full of rubber.
 

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Saw this earlier , its always some hidden agenda or a means toward another end . When these ideas come about that are liken to that of such inconceivable as if the state of florida made a ban upon local citrus or for that of importing . undermining their own states economy and quality of life as it relates to livelihood and recreation . We must stand to inform these appointed representatives that unless they represent and support our interest we will for sure withdraw our support for them as our representatives .

Not from Maine but all the same I lend my support below is a draft of my response .

Lest it be so , yet may it not be so , as at best many of these attempts of such legislation are to springboard toward another agenda of those who propose them or at the behest of those who have lobbied them into doing so. They smite the very constituents that appointed them into the very post they hold . In such a great recreational , sport and commercial fishing state of Maine . That this Representative Paul Davis , would propose such a legislation would undermine the well over half a billion dollar industry to his very state economy as well the over 50 local bait and tackle companies within the state along with the many jobs these companies and the industry contributes to the state locally . Now if you count in the tourism , lodging , gas , non resident licenses fees , tolls , dock and other angling fees which a large portion are in the purchasing artificial bait and lures , entertainment and taking in the great state of Maine seafood and other dining while staying there enjoying the states fishing . No state representative could do the state a more thoughtless disservice than to propose such a legislation that would effect the state commerce , tourism and overall effects upon its economy . Rethink , reconsider and redirect your political will toward endeavors that would empower , enrich and continue to strengthen what has afforded the state of Maine so much from an industry that is among other things synonymous with great fishing and the great outdoors.
 

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Local fisherman looks to sink rubber baits
By Mark Haskell
Sports Reporter
WARREN (Aug 23, 2008): The problem is much more clear than the solution, but for
local fish enthusiast Bill Gagnon of Warren and a host of other fish lovers,
they hope not for long.
Gagnon is hard at work helping the Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to
find a solution to stop the use of rubber worms in the fishing industry in
the Pine Tree State. The problem is backing up not only the health of many
fish in Maine, but also the fish themselves.
The problem with the rubber worms is that where the worms are not
biodegradable, the fish will often have these worms stuck inside them and
cannot digest them. This can cause an impact of growth of the fish,
mobility, and affect their natural way of life.
"These soft rubber baits are everywhere," said Bob Van Riper, a regional
fisheries biologist for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and
Wildlife. "If you walk into any sports store they have a row of them in
there. The problem is that when the fish eat these worms, they only break
down marginally. The bottom line is they are taking in an artificial
substance that does them no good."
The problem was realized when Gagnon was out fishing with a friend of his
and came upon a dead fish and, being an avid fisherman, was curious as to
what may have caused the fish to go belly up. Upon further inspection, the
fish had three rubber worms inside it. Fish cannot digest the rubber worms,
as they are not biodegradable.
"It really upset me," said Gagnon. "I was very much disturbed. It's a
catastrophe to the fisheries."
Since finding that fish three months ago, Gagnon called Van Riper and felt
that it was something that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and
Wildlife should look into. Van Riper asked Gagnon to assist him with the
research, and Gagnon agreed.
"Bill has kind of a groundswell going which is really a good thing," said
Van Riper. "He is pretty emotional about the whole thing. I just find it
heartening that there is someone out there that is willing to take the ball
and go with it. He has been doing just a terrific job."
According to Gagnon, the duo took a day about a month ago and "checked out
every lake and talked to every fisherman we could" between Searsmont and
Pemaquid Lake.
Their research showed a large number of fishermen in the majority of the
bodies of water researched had caught live fish that still had rubber worms
in them, causing problems for the fish.
"If they are eating them in every lake that we've found and checked so far,
why aren't they all over the country, let along all over the state," said
Gagnon. "Live bait starts to deteriorate almost instantly, and the hook
doesn't seem to bother them because they rot away inside."
Rubber worms are one of the best baits around as far as bass fishermen are
concerned. According to Gagnon, they have "more shape and more action" and
also in many cases, are scented. The worms are scented with oils, garlic,
salt and other scents that fish find attractive. Gagnon's research showed
that fish would take rubber worms as opposed to real worms by a resounding 3
to 1 ratio.
"At this day in age they've got it figured right down to a science of what
the fish want and what they like," said Gagnon. "[The rubber baits] come in
every shape and size. They make them for everything now."
Gagnon mentioned local bodies of water such as Sennebec Lake, Seven Tree
Pond, Pemaquid Lake and Megunticook Lake as bodies of water where live fish
have been found with rubber worms inside them.
This is a growing epidemic not only due to the amount of rubber worms that
fisherman use to actually catch the fish, but also the rubber worms that are
lost when fisherman lose their hooks and lines in the water, he said.
"We're finding that a lot of these worms are making their way one way or
another into the habitat and ultimately into the fish," said Van Riper. "If
we continue this we're going to end up with our lakes and ponds carpeted
with these things."
Given the fact that the majority of these worms are now scented, they
attract fish just as effectively sitting at the bottom of a lake as they do
jiggling on a hook.
The problem does not end with the fish. Animals that count on fish as means
of sustenance will also swallow the rubber worms and, in turn, will have
problems digesting them as well.
There are two possible scenarios in solving the problem, according to Van
Riper. The first would be for anglers to handle the problem themselves, and
demand that the rubber worms that are being made become biodegradable. The
other, which both Van Riper and Gagnon hope can be avoided, is to push the
problem to legislation.
"If the clientele that uses these baits demands it, then the industry is
going to change," said Van Riper. "The industry is aware of it, but hasn't
really been brought to the forefront. The knowledge is out there, now we
just need to spread it around."
"We want to try and take care of it ourselves," said Gagnon. "If we care at
all about the fisheries we've got to do something."
The ideal solution they are looking for, according to Gagnon, is to have
biodegradable worms that begin to deteriorate within 48 hours.
Until then?
"If you see them in the water, for God's sake get rid of them," said Gagnon.
"It is not illegal to use them. Anyone who feels right has all the right in
the world to use them. But I'm not going to guarantee that things aren't
going to change."
 

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I personally have an issue with non biodegradable rubber baits. I still fish with them and try to be as cautious as possible. I tried bio baits and did catch fish but you really have to quarantine them because they will eat everything else they touch. I use senko very little because of the fact they come off very easy. I pretty much only use them wacky with an o ring.
 

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i would like to see a consumer based push to biodegradable, but even myself have a hard time going biodegradable cause of lack options. and i dont see the bait companies leading a push without knowing that customers want it. i think a good alternative to government legislation would be for the tournament trails to only allow biodegradables, this would push a top down approach to change over. it would be unwelcome change in the short term with better long term gains if we can get baits to biodegrade within a month.
 

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As well I have given some of the bio baits a try and have got bass to bite . Other than the option issue as in not many of the companies out will follow suit making what we like in biodegradable form . Beside the contaminate issue Troy noted , if you leave them tied on they will dry up something awful tight to your hook , jig etc. and easy remedy is to just soak them over night until they reconstitute to where they are soft enough to remove . There is a brand that name does not come to mind that I read about that are actually a fish food protein based product .
 

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I don't think any company is going to go bio. I don't see zoom or Yamamoto doing it. I put 2 senkos out 3 years ago at my wife's aunts house. 1 in water and 1 laying just in the open on concrete. They are still there.
 

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Big Bite Baits made a patented biodegradable plastic that breaks down in the fish stomach. You cannot tell the difference between it and other plastics. The Lunkerville Bait Kit consisted of only these bio bait products.

Unfortunately, people weren't buying them, so they're discontinuing making them. Very sad.

http://www.biobait.com/about.php
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well i will let everyone in on a funny story or tip or what ever - i couple of years ago for what ever reason I DO NOT KNOW - i bought a package of GUMMY WORMS TO FISH WITH well LOL to eat mostly -- i wacky rigged a few through-out the day and CAUGHT SOME FISH - they did however GET real fat from the water! -- i could go that route!
 

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are there any Scuba divers in here? The reason why I ask is because I am a certified open water diver....

and from what I have seen with rubber worms (specifically 40-70ft deep in lake george) is rather disturbing. Senko's for example, just sit on the bottom, for weeks and weeks and while they sit there, they are like those toys you get for your kids that you put into a bowl of water and it grows 300% its size in a few days. They swell up, and sit there for months after. I have caught Crappie that went home to the dinner table that were full of rubber grubs and worms. I do not believe they should ban rubber's up there, but they should ban ones that arent biodegradable ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i agree with the bio - HOWEVER there has been research done and companies have broke out a line of bio products - and pulled them because they sat on the shelves! - NOW i will try to be MUCH BETTER about throwing a occasional used soft bait over the side of a boat!

BANNING rubber is what i read -i would assume if its banned in freshwater it will be banned in saltwater as well! (that was never spoke about) JUST BANNED!

THINK ABOUT IT - NO MORE

spinnerbaits
grubs
tubes - critters - worms ect!
popper flies
poppers
ETC & ECT!
take a CLOSE look in your boxes ANYTHING RUBBER/PLASTIC could be banned


and then if baits are banned what about FLY LINES - mono - flouro ect!

my point where do you draw the line!

this is pathetic - i spend many many days and weeks in Maine throughout the year - my guide friends would be out of business - the lodges i go to would be out of business - and many/many - others will be effected -- AND revenues from lic & permits that the state counted on would be gone!

the economy could not handle it PLAIN AND SIMPLE! - i would think that a real plan THAT could work for EVERYONE involved should be studied!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
up-date

Maine Sporting Camp Association

Hello Board Members & interested parties,

Everything went well at the Public Hearing yesterday… One surprise, I did not realize that Lance Wheaton was the one asking for this legislation.
I did give the testimony as stated in the letter that we had agreed upon and presented it to the committee. It was a packed chamber on this issue and along afternoon.
The committee heard testimonies from a wide range of organizations and individuals (Bass Organizations & Local Clubs, SAM, Maine Professional Guides Association, and IF&W to name a few). We we’re actually the only testimony, other them a mention from one of the members on the house committee to bring up the economic impact of this purposed Law.
The Committee is now compiling the information and has schedules a work session for February 19 th

In my opinion this bill is not going to pass. It is bring some needed attention to the issue. A public education program about the proper disposal these baits will go along ways in helping curve the problem until alternate materials can be found in the bait making process.
 

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I suspect that more fish die on their way to a dinner table than from picking up stray plastics.

Perhaps they should vote to ban that.

JIM
 

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The sporting camps association mentioned that he found out about the bill from his customers who called to let him know that they wouldn't come if this passed. Keep up the good work. The majority on the committee for this bill have been in office for less than two months. No telling what they could do. Workshop is 2 /19 so short personal notes to members on the committee are still needed. CC businesses that you use when you visit Maine.


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using Tapatalk 2
 

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So, are we talking about a few fish that get filleted, and have rubber worms in their gut, or is there solid, peer reviewed research that succinctly states that plastisol worms are harming our fisheries? Until then, I reserve comment or opinion.
 
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