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Dep put out statement that starting this summer hydrilla will be slowly removed from New Croton reservoir.
 

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To our anglers, boaters and permit holders at New Croton Reservoir:

We hope you have enjoyed the first few months of the fishing season in New York, which has been punctuated by record-setting cold temperatures and our first official heat wave of 2021. What an unusual spring we’ve had in the Hudson Valley!

We are writing to inform you of an upcoming project at New Croton Reservoir. Later this month, DEP will begin a multi-year project to remove Hydrilla from the reservoir. Hydrilla is an invasive weed that comes from Asia. It grows aggressively in water, forming dense mats that crowd out native plants, harm fish habitats, and interfere with boating, fishing and other recreation.

This disruptive plant can also harm water quality by exacerbating the growth of algae, and by introducing nutrients that change the taste and smell of water. Hydrilla can also grow thick enough to clog water-supply intakes.

In other words, Hydrilla is a pest that needs to be removed before it affects our natural resources and drinking water infrastructure.

Hydrilla was first discovered in New Croton Reservoir in 2014. The infestation of Hydrilla started as small patches along the shoreline, but it spread quickly to cover approximately 15 percent of the reservoir.

For several years, DEP has collaborated with New York State and local communities on a regional effort to remove Hydrilla from the reservoir and the downstream Croton River. Later this month, DEP will begin to remove Hydrilla from New Croton Reservoir by targeting the weed with an ultra-low dose of fluridone, a chemical that prevents it from growing. The same treatment was used by New York State to safely remove this aquatic plant from the Croton River. Treatment in the reservoir will happen during summer and early fall, under a permit issued by the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

DEP chose this method after consulting with a panel of scientists, engineers and other experts from across the United States. The expert panel studied the problem at New Croton, reviewed a range of methods to eliminate Hydrilla, and recommended fluridone as the most safe and effective option. DEP conducted a pilot study in 2019 and 2020 by using fluridone in two remote coves at the reservoir. The study confirmed the treatment would be safe and effective.

What changes will anglers see at the reservoir? During the summer and early fall, anglers should expect to see additional boats on the reservoir as our contractors apply the fluridone. DEP will also perform additional water quality testing. You will also notice additional signs around the reservoir, including at your boat storage areas. The yellow signs, required by the state, include specific information about fluridone. They will be accompanied by signs that explain the need and purpose of the treatment program.

Our work to remove Hydrilla from the reservoir will not affect the fish consumption advice provided by the New York State Department of Health (DOH). More information about that topic can be found on the DOH website by clicking here

We appreciate your patience and understanding while we work on this important effort to protect the reservoir, its fishery, and this critical source of drinking water for the region. If you have any questions, please feel free to call us at (845) 334-7868.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To our anglers, boaters and permit holders at New Croton Reservoir:

We hope you have enjoyed the first few months of the fishing season in New York, which has been punctuated by record-setting cold temperatures and our first official heat wave of 2021. What an unusual spring we’ve had in the Hudson Valley!

We are writing to inform you of an upcoming project at New Croton Reservoir. Later this month, DEP will begin a multi-year project to remove Hydrilla from the reservoir. Hydrilla is an invasive weed that comes from Asia. It grows aggressively in water, forming dense mats that crowd out native plants, harm fish habitats, and interfere with boating, fishing and other recreation.

This disruptive plant can also harm water quality by exacerbating the growth of algae, and by introducing nutrients that change the taste and smell of water. Hydrilla can also grow thick enough to clog water-supply intakes.

In other words, Hydrilla is a pest that needs to be removed before it affects our natural resources and drinking water infrastructure.

Hydrilla was first discovered in New Croton Reservoir in 2014. The infestation of Hydrilla started as small patches along the shoreline, but it spread quickly to cover approximately 15 percent of the reservoir.

For several years, DEP has collaborated with New York State and local communities on a regional effort to remove Hydrilla from the reservoir and the downstream Croton River. Later this month, DEP will begin to remove Hydrilla from New Croton Reservoir by targeting the weed with an ultra-low dose of fluridone, a chemical that prevents it from growing. The same treatment was used by New York State to safely remove this aquatic plant from the Croton River. Treatment in the reservoir will happen during summer and early fall, under a permit issued by the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

DEP chose this method after consulting with a panel of scientists, engineers and other experts from across the United States. The expert panel studied the problem at New Croton, reviewed a range of methods to eliminate Hydrilla, and recommended fluridone as the most safe and effective option. DEP conducted a pilot study in 2019 and 2020 by using fluridone in two remote coves at the reservoir. The study confirmed the treatment would be safe and effective.

What changes will anglers see at the reservoir? During the summer and early fall, anglers should expect to see additional boats on the reservoir as our contractors apply the fluridone. DEP will also perform additional water quality testing. You will also notice additional signs around the reservoir, including at your boat storage areas. The yellow signs, required by the state, include specific information about fluridone. They will be accompanied by signs that explain the need and purpose of the treatment program.

Our work to remove Hydrilla from the reservoir will not affect the fish consumption advice provided by the New York State Department of Health (DOH). More information about that topic can be found on the DOH website by clicking here

We appreciate your patience and understanding while we work on this important effort to protect the reservoir, its fishery, and this critical source of drinking water for the region. If you have any questions, please feel free to call us at (845) 334-7868.
Thank you for putting the whole notice up. I tried but had problems. I hope this is true. That hydrilla is ridiculous
 

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I was at Mid Croton a few days ago, and saw a ton of hydrilla all over the place.....
 

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Problem is when you try to kill one weed - you gonna kill others as well... how they are going to "target" hydrilla without destroying the milfoil? I understand their need to maintain these bodies of water for drinking purposes as priority #1 - but I wonder what the effect of just leaving it all alone vs. adding chemicals to remove unwanted plants really is.

I just hope it doesn't destroy the weed beds these fish use to feed and hide in the summer from the heat.

J.
 

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Jason: Marty feels it will have a terrible negative effect on the fishery....I agree
 
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